Pizza Party Math? Instead, Students Need More “Wait…What?” Moments

TL:DR: Ignoring the importance of the context of math word problems not only robs educators of an exciting opportunity to educate beyond the numbers but also may render prized instructional methods less effective than they could be.  Part of the solution could be CriticalMath.ca. I was in teacher’s college when I first heard about Math That Matters. […]

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Stop Using the Word Bully

We need to stop using the word “Bully” and all derivatives. The word “Bully” connotates visions of lunch-money-stealing, leather-jacket-wearing, buzz-cut-having, mean-girl-plotting playground vagabonds who are maladjusted to the point that they seek pleasure in the misery of others.  “Bullies” are seen as the exception, as outliers, who are socially adept but use their enhanced influence […]

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3 Characteristics of a Good Incentive Program

in·cen·tive inˈsen(t)iv/ noun a thing that motivates or encourages one to do something. Incentive programs.  When students aren’t meeting expectations, we use incentive programs to convince them to meet expectations and to make them want to comply with directives.  The following is a series of recommendations to consider when you’re developing your next incentive program! […]

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School-wide Incentive Programs Aren`t Doing What You Think They`re Doing

There are a multitude of variables as to why a student might struggle to meet expectations at school.  Maslow certainly comes to mind, especially when looking at this issue through an equity lens. So if the issues are complex, why do we focus on motivation?  Maslow does not indicate motivation as the factor in preventing […]

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Treat Each Student like Their Parent Is a Lawyer

Lawyers, by definition, are excellent advocates.  In fact, the French word for lawyer is avocat. Advocating requires the ability to assess a situation, review evidence, consider implications and effectively communicate thoughts, concerns and ideas.  Lawyers do this professionally, and these skills are transferable to many situations such as arguing whether or not the two-for-one golf coupon […]

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What’s missing from the self-regulation discussion? Part 3

In this last instalment of my self-regulation series, I focus on practical ways to co-regulate with students. (see part one here and part two here). … Co-regulation and attachment are like peas in a self-regulation pod. In order for co-regulation to happen, a positive relationship must exist between the adult and the child. Sarah Sanders, in a comment […]

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What’s missing from the conversation about self-regulation? Part 2

In my first post on the topic, I suggested we need to go further than environmental accommodations. This is especially true with students who don’t have the ability to self-regulate consistently. What’s missing from the discussion on self-regulation?  An emphasis on external regulation and co-regulation. … Regulation is simply the return to equilibrium. We regulate […]

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Self-regulation: What’s missing from the conversation?

This is the first of a three-part post on self-regulation.  It could be alternatively titled – Self-regulation: Beyond Environmental Accommodations and Social-Emotional Programming. Self-regulation is THE buzzword in my (and likely your) professional circle right now.  What is it? What can we do in the classroom to strengthen it? Stuart Shanker is the self-regulation darling […]

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